The 4 Netflix HR Practices That Took Us From Average to Awesome

HR Practices

Netflix doesn’t do bonuses. They don’t do formal reviews and they don’t do staff training.

Instead, their HR practices involve heavily scrutinizing employees’ skills and capabilities, and ruthlessly firing them for being good, not great.

Netflix and chill” it is not.

But, despite these seemingly harsh HR practices, 71% of Netflix employees would encourage their friends to become co-workers. They’re officially the best place in the world to work (even beating the likes of Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple). Their employee turnover is only 11% a year, which is below the 13% annual average for tech companies. They’ve maintained a voluntary attrition rate of 3-4% over the last two years, and they make around $2 million per employee.

Netflix has not only captivated the attention of its customers around the world, but also continues to grow its reputation as an attractive, sought-after employer.” – Forbes, Incubating Culture: How Netflix Is Winning The War For Talent

So, why is Netflix the best place to work, how do they maintain such a productive workforce, and what lessons can we take from them?

Grab some popcorn and let’s find as we go through the following in this Process Street post:

Settle in for the story of the year (that you can’t stream)… 🍿

Continue Reading

What is HR Management? How Your Employees Can Drive Success

hr managementAs organizations get larger they get more and more complex.

So many different people pushing and pulling in different directions.

This slows an organization down and makes it hard to operate. It makes it hard to achieve the best results.

Human resources departments should be the ones who sort out this mess. The ones who make sure everyone is working toward the same goals. The department which facilitates the other departments to do their best work.

But for many companies, HR isn’t working.

According to McKinsey:

  1. 42% of HR professionals are not taking action against priority areas
  2. 65% of HR professionals are not pursuing innovative approaches
  3. and 68% don’t have confidence in their strategy

That’s why, in this Process Street article, we’re going to take this problem seriously and look at:

Continue Reading

The Needlessly Complex History of SaaS, Simplified

Benjamin Brandall
August 30, 2017

Look up the history of any modern technology, and you’re taken on a quick-fire tour of antiques, innovations, failures, successes, bubbles, booms, and busts.

Unlike the history of the Roman Empire or Greek poetry, software history is almost immeasurably short.

It’s rich and it’s exciting, but it’s also full of strange developments. Developments that never really went anywhere, but serve as warnings to organizations of the kinds of flops to avoid.

New terminology and seemingly revolutionary inventions have cropped up every single year since the 1960s, but by now most of what formed the foundations for today’s software market is obsolete.

The Department of Defense’s SaaS timeline is broad (and not particularly exciting-looking), but it gets the job done.

In today’s world, the majority of businesses and consumers use software-as-a-service (SaaS). If you define SaaS an application that can be accessed through a web browser and is managed and hosted by a third-party, then Facebook, Snapchat, Google — and many things that most people would just call ‘websites’ — are SaaS products.

Continue Reading

Get a free Process Street account
and take control of your workflows today.

No Credit Card Required