Introduction:

Process Street - Financial Plan Template

''By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail'' - Benjamin Franklin

Process Steet’s Financial Plan Template is a guide to aid you through the process of producing a financial plan for your small business.

The financial plan template should be used in conjugation with Process Steet’s financial planning process. Once the financial planning process has been completed, the financial plan template can begin, utilizing the information obtained from the financial planning process.

Process Steet’s Financial Plan Template has condensed the process of creating a financial plan into the following tasks:

  • Profit And Loss Statement 
  • Cash Flow Statement 
  • Balance Sheet
  • Sales Forecast 
  • Personnel Plan

As mentioned before in the Financial Planning Process, 78% of small businesses fail due to the lack of a well-developed business plan, 77% fail due to incorrect pricing, and 79% fail due to starting out with too little money.

The above are failings which can be avoided with an effective financial plan. 

The aim of Process Steet’s Financial Plan Template is to help you produce a financial plan for your small business, to prevent business failure, and to enable you to actively plan ahead.

In this template, you will be presented with specialized questions given as a form field. Different form fields are used, such as subtasks, dropdown menus, short answers, long answers, and weblinks.

You can populate each form field with your own specific data. 

Our stop task feature has been used to enforce task order when needed. 

In addition, our conditional logic task has been used as required to guide you through the correct process path specific for your entered data.

Record checklist details

In this Financial Plan Template, you will be presented with the following form fields, which you are required to populate with your own specific data. More information is provided for each form field via linkage to our help pages:

To begin the Financial Plan Template, enter the required details into the form fields below.

This task is a stop task. You cannot move forward in this Financial Plan Template until tasks are complete.

Please note there is no set way to complete a financial plan. You can adapt this template yourself to suit your unique needs using our template editing feature

Consider whether you would like an accountant to review your financial plan

We recommend you hire an accountant to check through your financial plan.

Record accountant contact details

Profit and loss statement:

Consult your profit and loss statements

To complete a financial plan for your business, you must first be sure to have a completed and up to date financial statements with the relevant forecast projections.

See Process Street's financial planning process to see how you can forecast values in the financial statements for future planning and build your financial model. 

In this section of the Financial Plan Template, you will be consulting your up to date profit and loss statements, and forecast profit and loss statement values.

In the file upload widget below, you can upload your profit and loss statements including future forecasts created in your financial model.

Alternatively, you can provide a link to online documentation, such as a Google excel sheet.

Once you have consulted the uploaded/linked profit and loss statement, you can complete the subtasks, checking off each subtask when it is completed.

Consider the following:

  • 1
    Cost of sale or goods sold
  • 2
    Your revenue
  • 3
    Net income

Profit and loss statements are usually provided at each fiscal year quarter. They provide a summary of your companies revenue, costs, and expenses.

Calculate your current gross margin

You can use your calculated net revenue to calculate your current gross margin using the formula below.

Gross Margin = Net Income / Revenue 

Gross margin is a profitability ratio representing leftover dollar or revenue after paying cost of goods sold. 

List your current operating expenses

Consult your profit and loss statement once more, and make a list of your current operating expenses and your forecast operating expenses. You can use the web link form field below to link online documentation, such as a Google document, of this list. 

Alternatively, you can upload this list as a file using our file upload widget.

Operating expenses are defined as fixed expenses, occurred during the normal operations of a given business. Operating expenses do not fluctuate with revenue strength.

Calculate the relevant calculations for each month

To visualize the running of your business with a broader view, it is important to consider your finances for each month you have so far been operational in.

Check each month you will be considering in your calculations. The multiple choice form field provided represent a conditional logic step in the Financial Plan Template. Selecting a specific month will direct you to the relevant stage in this process.

  • 1
    January
  • 2
    February
  • 3
    March
  • 4
    April
  • 5
    May
  • 6
    June
  • 7
    July
  • 8
    August
  • 9
    September
  • 10
    October
  • 11
    November
  • 12
    December

Consider operating month: January

Calculate January's monthly revenue.

  • 1
    Calculate January's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for January
  • 1
    Calculate January's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate January's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate January's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate January's net income

Consider operating month: February

  • 1
    Calculate February's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for February
  • 1
    Calculate February's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate February's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate February's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate February's net income

Consider operating month: March

  • 1
    Calculate February's monthly revenue.

Consider the following:

  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for March
  • 1
    Calculate March's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate March's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate March's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate March's net income

Consider operating month: April

  • 1
    Calculate April's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for April
  • 1
    Calculate April's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate April's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate April's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate April's net income

Consider operating month: May

  • 1
    Calculate May's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for May
  • 1
    Calculate May's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate May's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate May's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate May's net income

Consider operating month: June

  • 1
    Calculate June's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Sum the cost of goods sold for June
  • 1
    Calculate June's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate June's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate June's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate June's net income

Consider operating month: July

  • 1
    Calculate July's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for July
  • 1
    Calculate July's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate July's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate July's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate July's net income

Consider operating month: August

  • 1
    Calculate August's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for April
  • 1
    Calculate August's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate August's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate August's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate August's net income

Consider operating month: September

  • 1
    Calculate September's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for September
  • 1
    Calculate September's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate September's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate September's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate September's net income

Consider operating month: October

  • 1
    Calculate October's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for October
  • 1
    Calculate October's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate October's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate October's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate October's net income

Consider operating month: November

  • 1
    Calculate November's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for November
  • 1
    Calculate November's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate November's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate November's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate November's net income

Consider operating month: December

  • 1
    Calculate December's monthly revenue.
  • 1
    Calculate the cost of goods sold for December
  • 1
    Calculate December's net revenue
  • 2
    Calculate December's gross margin
  • 3
    Calculate December's operating income
  • 4
    Calculate December's net income

Consider the relevant calculations for each year

If you have been operational for more than one year, you can calculate the net income on an annual basis. This is a conditional logic step. By choosing yes from the dropdown menu below, you will be directed to the relevant tasks as appropriate.

Calculate the relevant calculations for each year

Once you have calculated the net income for each operating month, you can calculate the annual net income. Consider the following:

  • 1
    Total the cost of goods sold for the year
  • 2
    Total operating expense for the year
  • 3
    Calculate annual net income
  • 4
    Calculate the annual net revenue
  • 5
    Calculate the annual gross margin

Annual Net Income  =

Annual Operating Income + Expenses (Annual Total Interest + Annual Total Taxes + Annual Total Depreciation + Annual Total Amortization) 

Annual Net Revenue = Annual Revenue - Annual Directly Related Selling Expenses 

Display monthly calculations

From the calculated monthly net incomes, you can create a chart, such as a bar chart, displaying this information. Charts are a great tool to display a lot of information in an easy to understand format

  • 1
    Display the net income via a visual chart for each month
  • 2
    Display the net revenue via a visual chart for each month
  • 3
    Display the gross profit margin for each month

Use each month on the Y-axis and the net income on the X-axis.

Display annual calculations

From the calculated annual net income/s, you can create a chart, such as a bar chart, displaying this information. Charts are a great tool to display a lot of information in an easy to understand format

  • 1
    Display the net income via a visual chart for each year
  • 2
    Display the net revenue via a visual chart for each year
  • 3
    Display the gross profit margin for each year

Use each month on the Y-axis and the net income on the X-axis.

Consider the key forecast values

See Process Street's financial planning process.

You should have the information on your financial statements projected into the future, and as far into the future as you deem necessary for your businese's financial plan.

Consider the following values:

  • 1
    Forecast net income
  • 2
    Forecast revenue
  • 3
    Forecast cost of goods sold

Calculate forecast gross margin

You can use your calculated forecast net revenue to calculate a forecast for gross margin using the formula below.

Forecast Gross Margin = Forecast Net Income / Forecast Revenue 

Gross margin is a profitability ratio representing leftover dollar or revenue after paying the cost of goods sold. 

Add forecasts to displays

To your annual and/or monthly charts, display the following forecast information. Display this information in a separate color so the forecast values can be separated from the actual values.

  • 1
    Display the forecast net income via a visual chart
  • 2
    Display the forecast net revenue via a visual chart
  • 3
    Display the forecast gross profit margin

Use each month on the Y-axis and the net income on the X-axis.

Cash flow statement:

Calculate your cash flow for each operating month

82% of businesses fail because of poor cash flow management. Producing a cash flow statement, understanding and managing your cash flow is extremely important.

The next stage of Process Street's financial plan template is to consider the cash flow statement and the forecasts made and added to this financial statement.

See Process Street's Cash Flow Report

  • 1
    Calculate your monthly cash flow for each operating month

The cash flow statement provides information in regards to the amount of cash your business brought in, the amounts of cash the business paid out, and what the business ending cash balance was. Cash flow statements are required on a monthly basis to provide the needed understanding of the amount of cash your business has, where the cash is coming from, where the cash is going, and on what schedule.

Calculate your cash flow for each operating year

82% of businesses fail because of poor cash flow management. Producing a cash flow statement, understanding and managing your cash flow is extremely important.

Once you have calculated the cash flow for the operating month, consider the cash flow for each operating year.

See Process Street's Cash Flow Report

  • 1
    Calculate your annual cash flow for each operating year

The cash flow statement provides information in regards to the amount of cash your business brought in, the amounts of cash the business paid out, and what the business ending cash balance was. Cash flow statements are required on a monthly basis to provide the needed understanding of the amount of cash your business has, where that cash is coming from, where the cash is going, and on what schedule.

Display monthly cash flow

As you have done for the monthly net income, you can visualize your monthly cash flow trends via displaying your monthly cash flow as a chart, such as a bar chart.

  • 1
    Display your monthly cash flow as a chart

Display annual cash flow

As you have done for the annual net income, you can visualize your annual cash flow trends via displaying your annual cash flow as a chart.

  • 1
    Display your annual cash flow as a chart

Add forecasts to displays

To your annual and/or monthly charts, display the following forecast information. Display this information in a separate color so the forecast values can be separated from the actual values.

  • 1
    Display the forecast cash flow

Use each month on the Y-axis and the net income on the X-axis.

Balance sheet:

Consider the balance sheet

The next stage of Process Street's financial plan template is to consider the balance sheet and the forecasts made and added to this financial statement.

See Process Street's Balance Sheet

Consider the below information from your balance sheet and your balance sheet forecasts. 

  • 1
    Consider the amount of cash you have in the bank.
  • 2
    Consider the amount of cash your customers owe you (if required).
  • 3
    Consider the amount of cash you owe your vendors? (if required)
  • 4
    Consider your assets (accounts receivable, money in the bank and inventory)
  • 5
    Consider your liabilities (accounts payable, credit card balances and loan repayments)
  • 6
    Consider your equity (owners equity, investors shares, retained earnings, stock proceeds)

Cumulative profit:

Calculate your cumulative profit

The next step of Process Steet’s Financial Plan Template is to calculate the cumulative profit for your business. 

Cumulative Profit = Retained Earnings - Net Profit/Loss

Retained earnings is a business's net income left over for business after the business has paid out dividends to its shareholders.

Consider your cumulative profit for each operating year

  • 1
    Calculate your retained earnings for each operating year.
  • 2
    From your calculated retained earnings, calculate your cumulative profit for each year.

Calculate your forecast cumulative profit

You can use your forecasts to calculate a forecast for your cumulative profit as per the formula below.

Forecast Cumulative Profit = Forecast Retained Earnings - Forecast Net Profit/Loss

Display your cumulative profit for each operating year

  • 1
    Display your cumulative profit for each year as a chart

Add forecasts to displays

To your annual and/or monthly charts, display the following forecast information. Display this information in a separate color so the forecast values can be separated from the actual values.

  • 1
    Display the forecast cumulative profit

Forecast Cumulative Profit = Forecast Retained Earnings - Forecast Net Profit/Loss

Use each month on the Y-axis and the net income on the X-axis.

Check your forecasts:

Consult your forecast data

Using Process Street's financial planning process, you would have created a series of different financial forecast models. Each of these models would have used a different method to deliver the required forecasts.  

You should consider every different model produced. These different models can then be tested in order to obtain a financial model of best fit for your business.

You can view the trends in your data from your plotting graphs for the following:

  • Net income 
  • Revenue
  • Gross Margin
  • Cumulative profit 

Form viewing your data displayed visually, you can view anomalies or abnormal data points. 

The dropdown menu represents a conditional step in this financial plan template. Selecting 'Yes' or 'No' will direct you to the relevant stage in this process.

Abnormal data points could be outliers or unrealistic forecasts. 

Investigate abnormal data points

You have identified abnormal data points that need to be investigated and explained.

Abnormal data point could be ''rogue'' data or seasonality impact, environmental impact, human error or changes in the business environment.

See what was happening at the time period of any anomaly to explain the abnormality.

You could have an unrealistic forecast, for example, a sales increase of 400%. You can adjust your assumptions in your model to account for this. 

Add real data to your model

Can you identify possible future changes that will occur, for which you know the impact? For example, the sales increase for new contract signs.

Detail known changes that need to be added to your forecast model.

Test your forecast data to the actual data

Look at a short time period which you have forecast financial parameters to test. Compare your forecast parameters to the actual financial parameters obtained in this time period.

To perform this comparison we will employ the within sample technique.

  • 1
    Determine the out-sample forecast error, which is the difference between the known results and those forecast by your model.
  • 2
    Determine your in-sample Mean Absolute Naive Error (MANE).
  • 3
    Is your out-sample forecast error better than your in-sample MANE? If so there is a good chance you have a workable model.

An ''in-sample'' prediction uses a subset of data to forecast values outside the estimated period. It is the sample data you know at the time you are building your model.

An ''out-sample'' forecast is used to evaluate the forecasted performance, reflecting the information available to the forecaster in real-time.

MANE = Absolute Naive Error / Number of Absolute Naive Error

Choose the model of best fits:

Select your financial model of best fit

You have created your financial model and tested it against the real data available. It is time to choose the model of best fit with your data.

  • 1
    Which model consistently delivered the most accurate results?
  • 2
    Which model had a better out-sample forecasting error?

Personnel plan:

Create a personal plan

As a small business, calculating your personal effects on the business should take no time and can be completed using one or two sentences

Check off the sub-tasks below on completion.

You can write your personal plan below in the long text form field. Ensure your personal plan includes the information listed as needed above.

  • 1
    Justify each team members necessity to the business.
  • 2
    Justify each team members salary.
  • 3
    Justify each team members equity share is applicable.
  • 4
    Sate the desired departments/team members and justify.
  • 5
    State the salaries of the desired departments/team members and justify.

Creating a personal plan is more important for larger businesses. Larger businesses are more complex, and time should be spent working out how you personally impact the business.

Business ratios:

Consider business ratios

You might want to consider the below business ratios for the completion of your financial plan. This next section is looking at calculating key business ratios not yet considered. 

Select the below business ratios you would like to include in your financial plan. The below is a conditional step, depending on each option you choose will determine the relevant page you are then directed to.

You can calculate these ratios on both your actual financial data and your forecast financial data. 

Using the multiple choice form field below, select the business ratios you would like to calculate.

  • 1
    Return on sales
  • 2
    Return on investment
  • 3
    Debt-to-equity
  • 4
    Current ratio
  • 5
    Working capital

Calculate the return on sales

To calculate the return on sales ratio, you can use the operating income and the net revenue which have been calculated in the previous tasks. 

Return On Sales = Operating Income / Net Revenue For the Period

  • 1
    Add return on sales value/s on relevant documentation

The return on sales is a ratio evaluating a company's operating efficiency.

Calculate the return on investment

To calculate the return on your investment, you must divide the net income previously calculated by the total investment. Multiply this by 100 gives the return on investment as a percentage.

Return On Investment = (Net Income / Total Investment) * 100

  • 1
    Add return on investment value/s on relevant documentation

The return on investment is a ratio used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment. It can also be used to evaluate the efficiency of a number of different investments.

Calculate the debt-to-equity

To calculate the Debt-To-Equity ratio, you must refer back to your balance sheet.

Consult your balance sheet to obtain the below information:

  • 1
    Total liabilities (Short Term Debt + Long Term Debt + Other Liabilities).
  • 2
    Shareholder equity.

Debt-To-Equity = Total Liabilities / Shareholder Equity 

  • 1
    Add debt-to-equity value/s on relevant documentation

The debt-to-equity ratio is used to measure companies financial leverage, that is, it measures the extent a company is financing its operations through debt versus wholly owned funds.

Calculate the current ratio

To calculate the Current Ratio, you must refer back to your balance sheet.

Consult your balance sheet to obtain the below information:

  • 1
    Current assets
  • 2
    Current liabilities

Current Ratio = Current Assets / Current Liabilities

  • 1
    Add current ratio value/s on relevant documentation

The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a companies ability to pay short-term obligations (short term obligations are those due in one year). The ratio provides information to investors on how current assets can be maximized to satisfy current liabilities.

Calculate the working capital

To calculate the Working Capital you must refer back to your balance sheet.

Consult your balance sheet to obtain the below information:

  • 1
    Current assets
  • 2
    Current liabilities

Working Capital = Current Assets - Current Liabilities 

  • 1
    Add working capital value/s on relevant documentation

A company with substantial working capital has the potential to invest and grow. The working capital indicates a companies financial health in the short term, liquidity and operation efficiency.

Break-even analysis:

Calculate the contribution margin

Conducting break-even analysis is vitally important to measure your business growth. Break-even analysis helps you determine your fixed and variable costs to ensure that you set your service/product prices effectively to ensure a profit is made.

You can perform the break-even analysis on your current data, to see how you are currently performing, and on your forecast data, to see how you are expected to perform in the future.

In this Financial Plan Template, we are going to calculate the break-even point based on sales in dollars.

To begin, the contribution margin needs calculating. The formula used to calculate the contribution margin is given below.

Contribution Margin = Price Of Product/Service - Variable Costs 

To give your contribution margin as a percentage, divide the value obtained from the above by the price of the product/service and multiply this by 100. This is termed the contribution ratio.

Contribution Ratio (%) = (Contribution Margin / Price Of Product/Service) x 100

  • 1
    Add contribution margin on relevant documentation
  • 2
    Add return contribution ratio on relevant documentation

The break-even point of a business is the stage where the revenue equalizes with its costs. 

The contribution margin indicates the incremental money generated for each product/service sold after the deduction of the companies variable costs per unit. It measures how much an individual product/service contributes to the profitability of a company.

Calculate the break-even point

You can use the contribution margin value to calculate your break-even point. Use the formula below to do this.

Once you have calculated your break-even point, you can determine the sales needed for you to make the required profit.

Break-Even Point = Fixed Costs / Contribution Margin

  • 1
    Add the break-even point value on relevant documentation

Analyze financial plan:

Identify warning signs and areas for improvement

Your financial plan produced, business ratios calculated and your break-even analysis will provide key information for your current business performance and your projected business performance. You can analyze this information to identify warning signs and areas for financial improvement.

Create an action plan

Based on the previously identified, current and predicted, warning signs and areas for improvements, you can produce an action plan. 

The action plans aim is to mitigate against concerning financial parameter values and to improve your business financials based on the identified areas for improvement.

You can use our file upload widget below to upload your detailed action plan.

Final stage:

Review documentation

This is the final step in the financial plan template. The documents produced from running this template should be easy to read and understand. It is important to review these documents

  • 1
    Review documents related to your financial plan

We recommend you hire an accountant to check through your financial plan.

Schedule a meeting with your accountant

You can use Process Street's email widget below to schedule an appointment with your accountant.

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